Religious Minority Rights

One of the social consequences of distinguishing people on the basis of religion and how religiosity is practised is the formation of overt and covert minorities who live in a single land like separate pieces. In an early typology, Iran's religious minorities can be divided into three main groups.


Legal minorities:


The first group includes religious-cultural minorities whose presence is tolerated by the religious government, and they form a kind of "legal" minority in the country. Followers of non-Islamic historical religions have a limited number of seats in parliament among these minorities (Christians, Jews, Zoroastrians) are controlled and very fragile freedoms in performing their religious rites. The situation of the Sunnis as Iran's largest religious minority is very special, as their demographic and geopolitical weight, as well as their different reading of Islam, foster a kind of ideological distrust and scepticism in the Shiite
regime that has persisted since the beginning of the revolution. The name of this relationship can be called a kind of cold peace between two different sepoys and rivals of Islam. Strict oversight of the activities of Sunni religious figures such as Maulvi Abdul Hamid, the absence of Sunni elites in the upper echelons of government, or restrictions on Sunnis' ability to perform religious rites (even mass prayers), especially in Shiite areas. Unprecedented examples of this religious discrimination and cold peace are based on deep
mutual distrust.


Illegal minorities:


The second group includes minorities who are not recognized by the Islamic system and who are direct victims of discriminatory policies of the religious government because of their beliefs. Followers of the Baha'i faith or dissident Shiite religious tendencies (mystical circles, Yarsan (Ahl al-Haq) Christian converts, Gonabadi dervishes ...) are among this group, which can be called third and fourth-degree citizens because they are for Escaping from punishment and government violence, they sometimes have to hide their religion and perform religious rites in secret. The inhumane restrictions on Baha'is are a form of official apartheid, ranging from religious rites and ceremonies to access to education and government jobs, economic activities, and even funerals. Multifaceted violence against this minority in the world is becoming less and less of the horrific religious repression of the Middle Ages.


Infertile groups to religion or government religion:


The third group of victims of religious discrimination in Iran are those who do not have a particular religion or have a different relationship with religion and religiosity in the style of government. This large and scattered group should be considered the silent and anonymous victims of religious rule. Not only can they not reveal their beliefs in various areas of social life, but they are sometimes forced to hypocritically and falsely pretend to be religious, to impose this or that religious principle, to compel religious rites, and to endure the endless sufferings of life in government. Live a religion that is silent within itself.

 
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • YouTube
  • Instagram
OIP.jpg
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • YouTube
  • Tumblr Social Icon
  • Instagram

ایران نوین

All Rights Reserved  to Modern Iran

updated in May 2020

Copyright © 2020  Modern Iran